About Jaipur

Jaipur is the capital and largest city of the Indian state of Rajasthan in Northern India. It was founded on 18 November 1727 by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II, the ruler of Amber, after whom the city is named. The city today has a population of 3.1 million. Jaipur is known as the Pink City of India.

The city is unusual among pre-modern Indian cities in the regularity of its streets, and the division of the city into six sectors by broad streets 34 m (111 ft) wide. The urban quarters are further divided by networks of gridded streets. Five quarters wrap around the east, south, and west sides of a central palace quarter, with a sixth quarter immediately to the east. The Palace quarter encloses the Hawa Mahal palace complex, formal gardens, and a small lake. Nahargarh Fort, which was the residence of the King Sawai Jai Singh II, crowns the hill in the northwest corner of the old city. The observatory, Jantar Mantar, is one of the World Heritage Sites. Included on the Golden Triangle tourist circuit, along with Delhi and Agra, Jaipur is an extremely popular tourist place in India.

Jaipur has been laid according to the conventional nine-grid pattern that astrologers believe to be lucky, and which has been recommended in the ancient Indian treatise on architecture. Each grid consists of a square, and these have been planned so that, at the heart of the city is the City Palace. Spread around it, in rows, are public buildings, the residences of noblemen, the living and trading quarters of merchants and artisans. Straight, wide roads run through the city, while a high, crenelated wall that forms its defense is pierced with seven gateways that serve as entry points. Today, these walls may be more difficult to spot since the city has grown far beyond its original plan, but they are still there, proof that though Jaipur saw no great siege, it was more than adequately prepared for it.

Jaipur architectural planning may have been ancient, but its execution was definitely modern. Best represented by the City Palace complex, it brought together all that was excellent in Rajput and Mughal architecture, creating a new tradition that found wide currency over much of north India. As in the Mughal tradition, the durbar or court areas became much more open, characterized by a series of arched pavilions held on delicately crafted pillars. Ornamentation had always been a part of the state architectural heritage, now it became much more opulent. The private wings of the family also extended their entertainment areas. Since defense was no longer a primary concern, larger, more ornamental windows were built to overlook the streets or courtyards outside these wings. Gardens were no longer planned within the internal courtyards only but were added to the external vistas, and water, a basic feature of Mughal palaces and gardens, was utilized in a similar fashion, in canals and fountains.

Jaipur has much to offer visitors everything from pageants and festivals to extraordinarily clad people, a wealth of handicrafts, a royal legacy of palaces, and sightseeing that will occupy their time. However, should the visitors simply choose to walk around the streets of the old city instead, they will not regret it. All of Jaipur is an architectural gem, and no scheduled sightseeing can even hope to do justice to this rare city.

Getting Acquainted

Languages are spoken
Hindi, Rajasthani, and English to a small degree are commonly spoken in hotels and restaurants, staff speaks English as well as Hindi. One can easily communicate with a minimum knowledge of Hindi or English

Tipping
Tipping is common for porters in hotels as also the stewards and bearers and tourist guides, though it is not the practice with taxi and auto drivers. The standard amount in hotels and restaurants is 10% of the total bill.

Dressing
The traditional dress like the skirt and top are woven by women with traditional taste while the saree and shalwar kameez is also common with women. Men wear trousers and shirts. Simply dressed women are bound to be stared at. Wear informal, loose clothes during the day and you won’t feel uncomfortable. Smart, casual clothes will do for eating out in the evening or visiting friends.

Buying Liquor
Jaipur observes dry days on national Holidays. Liquor outlets are there in all markets run by private owners. All big hotels serve liquor and so do several restaurants and pubs. Dry days are not applicable to hotels and restaurants.

Banking Hours
Public sector banks are open from 1000 hrs to 14000 hrs. from Monday to Friday and up to 12 noon on Saturdays. Some private Indian banks are also open 8.00 pm and many have the ATM facilities around the city. There are several foreign banks located in and around commercial areas.

Moving Around Transport
Jaipur has three major modes of transport buses, tempos, minibusses, three wheeler taxi, and auto rickshaws. There are also unmetred tourist taxis whose stands are situated mainly at all the gates on M.I. Road. Hotels and travel agents can also arrange for taxis.
The buses ply on set routes and charge a standard fare. One should insist on paying the autorickshaw driver through meter only. For luggage one has to pay an additional rupee for one piece of luggage. The three-wheelers can also be hired for a day on an agreed fare of 550 to 600 for 8 hours.

Transportation
Air : Indian Airlines connect Jaipur with Delhi, Jodhpur, Udaipur, Aurangabad, Bombay, Varanasi, Calcutta, Ahmedabad.

Rail: Jaipur is connected by rail with Delhi, Agra, Ahmedabad, Ajmer, Abu Road (Mount Abu), Udaipur, Bombay, and Sawai Madhopur.

Road: Good motorable roads connect Jaipur with Delhi 258 km, Agra 236 km, Bikaner 321 km, Udaipur 405 km, Ajmer 131 km, Jodhpur 316 km, Bharatpur 176 km, Jaisalmer 638 km and Mumbai 1202 km

Bus: Regular buses ply from Jaipur to the above places and Alwar, Kota, Sariska, Mathura, Indore, Chittorgarh, and Barmer.

TOURIST PLACES TIMINGS & COST

The City Palace
One of the most magnificent marvels of Jaipur is the City Palace complex which has a rare combination of the finest blends of Rajasthani and Mughal architecture. In the heart of the old city, it has a vast area. The outer wall was built by Jai Sigh and additions made up to the 20th , Century. Many buildings, well planned gardens and huge courtyards are part of the complex.

For visiting dignitaries, Sawai Madho Singh ii, constructed theMubarak Mahal (Welcome Palace) as a reception centre. The Mahal comes before the main complex, though it now forms a part of the Sawai Man Singh ii museum. The museum has an array of royal costumes, shawls, embroideries, Benaras silk sarees, the Maharaja’s Pyjamas, Chogas, jamawars, kamarbandhs, musical instruments like the giant sized tanpuraaand sarangis, and a set of Sawai Madho Sing I who was just over seven feet tall, over four feet wide and supported a goliathic weight of 250 kilograms. Palace

A delight is the Maharani’s Palace, now the armoury with arms of the 15th centurywhich include the deadly Rajput scissor action daggers which have unique working action (after the dagger entered the body, the handles were released and the blades spread. During withdrawl killing the victim). The guns include the one that also served as walking sticks, one of the size of a small canon fired from a camel’s back, double – barrel guns, early handguns, matchlocks and percussion cap guns, swords with pistols attached to the blades, daggers with handles of crystal and ivory, katars, churris, peak-kubz jambhiya, Persian and Rajput swords, Deccan hand bows and arrows, battle axes, shields, maces, and emerald encrusted sword presented by Queen Victoria to Maharaja Sawai Ram Singh (1835-1880).

Diwan-e-Khas
(Hall of Private audience)is housed between the art gallery (once the diwan-e-aam-hall of public (audience) and the armoury. The most attractive features are the two strling silver vessels (in the marble paved gallery) in which Maharaja Madho Singh II, a devout Hindu, took holy water during a visit to Europe. The two vessels are massive standing 160 cms and have a capacity of 9000 litres each. They are listed in the Guiness book of records as the biggest silver vessel in the world. The art gallery in the erstwhile Diwan-e-aam has a well preserved ceiling on which the original semi precious stones still retain their lusture. Suspended from the ceiling is a massive chandelier mde of crystal. The art gallery also has miniature paintings of the Rajasthani, Mughal and Persian schools featuring religious themes mainly scenes of Ramayana. There are among the 20,000 manuscripts that the museum boasts of. One can also see the finest carpets from the heart of Afghanistan & Lahore.

Chandra Mahal
It is the only part of the complex that is inhabited and is occupied by the royal family. The ground floor of the palace is open to the visitors, has some exhibits. In the courtyard outside is the elegantly designed Peacock Gate.

Timings: 09:30 A.M. to 17:00 P.M. 

Phone: 0141-4088888

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 100

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 50

Video Camera: INR 300

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults (Included Camera, inclusive of Entry ticket to Jaigarh Fort): INR 400

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 250

Video Camera: INR 300

Jantar Mantar
Jantar Mantar is the largest and best preserved of Sawai Jai Singh’s five observatories. It is built in stone and marble whose setting and shapes designed scientifically and which are one of the high points of medieval Indian astronomy.

Timings: 09:00 A.M. to 16:30 P.M. 

Phone: 0141-2610494

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Children (5 – 12 years): INR 15

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults (Included Camera, inclusive of Entry ticket to Jaigarh Fort): INR 200

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 250

Video Camera: INR 300

Moti Doongari And Lakshmi Narayan Temple
Among the important landmark dotting the Southern horizon is the small privately owned hilltop fort of Moti Doongari which is shaped like a Scottish castle, the Ganesh temple at the foot of the hill and the marble built Lakshmi Narayan Temple.

Timings: 06:00 A.M. to 12 P.M. & 03:00 P.M. to 09:00 P.M.

Phone: 0141-2620969

Hawa Mahal – The Palace of Wind
The palace of wind- a fascinating landmark of Rajasthan, was built by orders of Poet king, Sawai Pratap Singh in the18th Century, and is the most remarkably designed monument in Jaipur. What is seen from the serah Deori bazaar is the multi – niched five – storey high backside of the complex. It was conceived to provide adequate vantage position behind the stone carved mesh like screens to the palace women for watching the royal processions passing through the bazaar. It now has a museum and the collections include paintings, coins, handicrafts and sculptures. Jaipur – past and present is the special feature of the museum.

Timings: 09:00 A.M. to 16:30 P.M.

Phone: 0141-2620969

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Student (5-12 years): INR 5

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults (Included Camera, inclusive of Entry ticket to Jaigarh Fort): INR 200

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 250

Video Camera: INR 300

Govindji Temple
The city palace complex also houses the Govindji Temple and is a temple of Lord Krishna and a large no. of people visit it. The temple is built in such a fashion that the king could see the deity from Chandra Mahal opposite it.The temple is surrounded by gardens and palaces. The image of Govind Devji was originally installed in a temple in Vrindavan.

Jagat Shiromani Temple
The beautifull carved Jagat Shiromani Temple houses the idol of Lord Krishna and is popularly associated with celebratred saint poetess Mira Bai. The old temple of Narsinghji and stepwell Panna – Meena – ki – Baodi, which still bears witness to its past glory are also located in the vicinity.

Jaigarh Fort
The western skyline is dominated by the extensive parkotas (walls), watch towers and the gateways of Jaigarh Fort. It is one of the few military structures of the medieval India preserved almost intact containing palaces, garden, open and covered reservoirs, a granary, an armoury, a well planned tower and a giant mounted canon- the Jai Ban – one of the biggest in the world.

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 100

Student (5-12 years): INR 35

Camera / Video Camera: INR 200

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 200

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 85

Video Camera: INR 400

Car are allowed inside at INR 50

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Man Sagar Lake (Jal Mahal)
Jal Mahal was built by Sawai Pratap Singh in1779 A.D. in the midst of the Man Sagar lake as a pleasure spot. The lake was formed by constructing a dam between the two hills by Sawai Man Singh I. During winter months one can see a large number of migratory birds at the lake.

Amber Palace And Fort Complex
Situated just over 10 kms away from Jaipur on the Jaipur – Delhi highway is Amber, which was the ancient capital of the Jaipur state. A bus leaves from Hawa Mahal every 30 minutes and a well – laid out road takes the visitor out of the city and very soon one witnesses lush green hills. On the notices a lake and standing next to it ids the majestic Amber Fort which is several rulers of the erstwhile state of Jaipur recognized as a vantage military building. The excursion starts with the Dil-e-Aram garden which is laid out in the traditional Mughal style. One can climb up to the fort from the road in10 minutes , go up by a jeep or even on elephant back. The diwan-e-aam (hall of public audience) has latticed galleries and double row of columns each having a capital in the elephants on the top. To the right are steps that lead to the kali temple. The temple offers a wonderful sight and has huge doors made of silver elevation and can be entered through a decorated gateway. The Jai Mandir has a glittering ceiling of mirrors and elegant inlaid panels. In front of the Jai Mandir is Sukh Niwas with a door made of sandalwood, inlaid with ivory with a channel running through which once carried cool water. The zenana or womens apartments were designed in a manner which could easily facilitate the entry of the maharaja to various chambers without any of the concubines aware of any visitor.

Timings: 08:00 A.M. to 17:30 P.M. 

Phone: 0141-2530293

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 100

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 10

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 500

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 100

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Nahargarh Fort
It is 15 kilometers from Jaipur beyond the hills of Jaigarh and is like a watchful sentinel guarding Sawai Jai Singh beautiful capital. Much of the original structures are in ruins. From atop a hill, the fort offers a scenic view of the city below. Rajasthan Tourism has started a cafeteria where beer and snacks are available from 10:00 A.M to 10:00 P.M.

Timings: 09:00 A.M. to 18:00 P.M.

Phone: 0141-5137686

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 5

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 200

Children (05 – 12 Years): INR 25

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Swarghasuli / Isarlat
The tower on the western side of Tripolia Bazar is the highest structure in old Jaipur and was built by Ishwari Singh in 1749 A.D. to commemorate an important victory.

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults: INR 50

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 200

Ram Niwas Bagh & Zoo
To provide an open space and greenery to the citizens, there is a big garden, with a zoo, an aviary, a greenhouse, a herbarium, a museum and several sports grounds. It was built during the reign of Sawai Ram Singh II in 1869 as a famine relief project.

Dolls Museum 

Located near the Police Memorial towards the back side of SMS hospital is the Dolls Museum. There are attractive dolls from various countries and is housed in the compound of the school for the deaf and the dumb.

Timings: 09:30 A.M. to 04:30 P.M. 
Phone: 0141- 2619359

Sisodia Rani Garden
It is eight kilometers away from Jaipur on the road to Agra. Several landscaped gardens were constructed by the kings and the courtiers in the 18th and 19th centuries with being one built by Sawai Jai Singh for hisSisodia queen, the Sisodia Rani Ka Bagh. It consist of tiered multilevel gardens with fountains, watercourses and painted pavilions.

Timings: 08:00 A.M. to 17:30 P.M. 

Phone: 0141-2530293

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 10

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 200

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Albert Hall
It is situated in the beautiful Ram Niwas Bagh Garden. This beautifully designed saracenic structure was designed by Sir Swinton Jacob. It was opened in 1887 as a public museum. It contains rare collection of decorative art objects, paintings, sculptures, an Egyptian Mummy and the well known Persian Golden Carpet.

Timings: 09:00 A.M. to 17:00 P.M. 

Phone: 0141-2570099

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 40

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 20

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 300

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 150

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Vidhyadhar Garden
This garden is named after Vidhyadhar who was the chief architect and town planner of Sawai Jai singh II. It falls just before the Sisosdiya Garden and the gardens have been planned in the medieval style. Every evening, lights concealed at the base of the surrounding hills lighten up the place.

Timings: 09:30 A.M. to 04:30 P.M. 

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 10

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR200

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 25

Full ticket will be charged for child above 07 years.

Gaitore
It is eight kilometers away from Jaipur on the road to amber, It has memorial of queens in Maharani – Ki – Chattri complex near the Ramgarh Road crossing. To the west, in a narrow valley, is the royal cremation ground and the cenotaphs of Jaipur rulers with exception of Sawai Ishwari Singh who was cremated outside Jai Niwas Garden.

Galta 
In the vicinity of the city, 10 kms from Jaipur, Galta is situated amidst the range of hills east of the city. On the top of the hill, overlooking the the Galta valletis a Sun temple. The east of the temple is a reservoir or a tank which is fed by spring of pure water falling from a Gaumukh or an outlet shaped like the mouth of a cow. On way to Galta, by the Ghat – Ki – Guni, is a range of hills crowned with the fort of Amagarh.

Statue Circle
The full length white marble statue of Sawai Jai Singh installed in the centre of the circle in the newly developed C Schemearea was erected as a tribute to the founder of Jaipur.

Birla Planetaurium
The planetaurium is on the Statue Circle and is made of white marble. One can get a view of the cosmos with the production and sound system of the planetaurium.
Show Timing: 11:00 A.M., 01:00 P.M., 03:00 P.M., 05:00 P.M., 06:00 P.M. and 07:00 P.M.
Phone: 0141-2385367

Entry Fees: INR 50

Nahargarh Biological Park
Nahargarh Biological Park a part of theNahargarh Sanctuary is the most recent addition to Rajasthan adventure tourism. Located on the outskirts of the pink city of Jaipur on the Jaipur Delhi highway. In the vicinity of Nahargarh Fort, the park displays the most beautiful surroundings. It is situated alongside Aravali hills and covers 7.2 Square kms.

Famous for itsvast flora and fauna, its main aim to conserve it. It also doubles up as great place to educate people and conduct research on existing flora and fauna. At Nahargarh Biological Park, Ornithologists can expect to see over 285 species of birds, of which the most popular is white – naped tit, which only can be found here. When you visit the park make sure you also head to Ram Sagar, which is a famous among bird watchers and makes for a great spot to catch different species of birds.

Nahargarh Zoological Park is worth your visit and houses animals in there rescue centre includes animals like Leopard, Asiatic Lion, Sloth Bear, Caracal, Bengal Tigers, Panthers, Hyennas, Wolves and several species of deer, Gharials, Crocodile, Pangolin Jackal, Wild Dog, Jungle Civet, Fishing Cats, Ratel, Coomon and Desert Fox, Rhesus Monkey and Langur, Sloth Bear, Himalyan Black Bear, Wild Boar etc. The zoo here is open from 15th March to 14th October between 08:30 A.M. to 05:30 P.M. and from 15th October to 14th March, 2018.
Note: The Park is closed on Tuesday.

Entry Fees for Indians

Adults (Included Camera): INR 50

Entry Fees for Foreign Nationals

Adults: INR 300

Students (5 – 12 Years): INR 20

Car / Jeep: INR 200

Motor Cycle: INR 30

Auto Rickshaw: INR 60

Bus: INR 300

Museum of Gem & Jewellery
The newly built museum showcases the heritage and fascinating story of Gem and Jewllery and itsevolution in Jaipur. The city is known for its fine gem cutting, polishing and jewellery craftsmanship, especially Kundan – Meena and stone jewellery. You start with the short audio visual presentation about the museum and its history. The sections of the museum showcases rough stone section, special stones, fossils, sunthetic stones, 100 plusf gem stones, large rocks, a gem stone chart to help you know which sone will be beneficial for you, books, calendars, publications, navratna and its correlation to navgrahas and thousands of varieties of stones and unique jewellery made out of these precious, semi precious and artificial stones.
Timings: 10:00 A.M. to 06:00 P.M.
Phone: 4916564/65
Entry Fees: INR 50

Walk – Through War Museum against Pakistan. 
Located at Amar Jawan Jyoti, the museum uses 3 D videos and photos to narrate tales of the states soldiers and their selfless sacrifice in India’s three main wars. Apart from paying tribute to these martyrs, it also provides information on the various types of weapons used by soldiers during the different wars If you have plans to drop in at the museum, don’t miss out the light and sound show, with a voice over by Irfaan Khan, for enjoyable, immersive experience.
Light & Sound Show Timing: 03 Shows between 7:30 P.M. to 10 P.M.